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Wednesday

April 2014

23

ANNUAL MS SUMMIT IS MARCH 15

Free event is a day of education and networking for those affected by multiple sclerosis.

The 2014 MS Summit will be held on Saturday, March 15 at the Country Springs Conference Center in Pewaukee. The event brings together individuals and families from throughout Wisconsin who are affected by multiple sclerosis for a day of networking and education in a supportive and social atmosphere. There is no cost to attend, but registration is required. To register, visit wisMS.org or call 262-369-4400.

The 2014 MS Summit will include:
• Updates on the latest in MS research, presented by Bonnie Dittel, PhD, senior investigator at the BloodCenter of Wisconsin-Blood Research Institute who was inducted into the National MS Society’s Volunteer Hall of Fame in November for her contributions to MS research.

• A wellness and lifestyle panel featuring Chris Cronsell, MD, Wheaton Franciscan-St. Francis Center for Neurological Disorders; Tammy Gallow, RD, ProHealth Care Waukesha Memorial Hospital; and Alexander Ng, PhD, FACSM, associate professor in the Exercise Science Program at Marquette University who focuses on symptomatic fatigue in chronic disease such as MS.

• A celebration of top Mission Driver fundraisers and volunteers who supported the MS movement in 2013. The MS Summit will be held at Country Springs Conference Center, 2810 Golf Road, Pewaukee. Discounted room rates and waterpark tickets are available for those who attend MS Summit. Visit www.wisMS.org or call 262-369-4400 to register.


About Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide. More than 10,000 children, women and men have been diagnosed in Wisconsin, giving the state one of the highest incidence rates in the country.

About the National Multiple Sclerosis Society
MS stops people from moving. The National MS Society exists to make sure it doesn’t. The Society addresses the challenges of each person affected by MS by funding cutting-edge research, driving change through advocacy, facilitating professional education, collaborating with MS organizations around the world, and providing programs and services designed to help people with MS and their families move forward with their lives. To move us closer to a world free of MS, the Society invested $48 million in 2013 to support more than 350 new and ongoing research projects around the world. The Society is dedicated to achieving a world free of MS. Join the movement by contacting the National Multiple Sclerosis Society-Wisconsin Chapter at wisMS.org or 262-369-4400 (toll-free inside of Wisconsin 800-242-3358).

Early and ongoing treatment with an FDA-approved therapy can make a difference for people with multiple sclerosis. Learn about your options by talking to your health care professional and contacting the National MS Society at nationalMSsociety.org or 1-800-FIGHT-MS (344-4867).


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